NBA free agency 2024: Team needs, cap space, more for all 30 teams [1500x844]
NBA free agency 2024: Team needs, cap space, more for all 30 teams [1500x844] (Credit: Illustration by ESPN)

Jays Bichette exits with strained calf set for MRI

The NBA free agency period has started and expect some big deals in what's turning to be a pivotal offseason. 

Stars players such as Klay Thompson and Paul George are now among the big free agents on the market. LeBron James is also a free agent though he is expected to return to the Los Angeles Lakers.

Several other stars -- James Harden (LA Clippers) Pascal Siakam (Indiana Pacers), OG Anunoby (New York Knicks), Malik Monk (Sacramento Kings), Scottie Barnes (Toronto Raptors) -- will sign new deals to remain with their respective teams.

We're breaking down for all 30 teams what to watch, team needs, salary cap analysis, available exceptions, the impact of the collective bargaining agreement, the depth chart, extension candidates and free agents.

Notes: Depth charts include expected roles for players who are under contract for the 2024-25 season. There's also an explainer for Bird rights at the end of this piece. The future draft assets rating from 1-10 takes into account first- and second-round picks each team possesses in the next seven years. For example, the Oklahoma City Thunder rate a 10, with 28 picks (13 first-rounders, 15 second-rounders) while the LA Clippers (with two second-rounders) rate a 1.

Jump to a team: ATL | BOS | BKN | CHA | CHI | CLE DAL | DEN | DET | GS | HOU | IND LAC | LAL | MEM | MIA | MIL | MIN NO | NY | OKC | ORL | PHI | PHX POR | SAC | SA | TOR | UTA | WAS

Atlanta Hawks

Offseason transactions: Zaccharie Risacher (first round), Dyson Daniels (trade), Larry Nance Jr. (trade), E.J. Liddell (trade)

Offseason priority: The Dejounte Murray trade to New Orleans now clears a path to extend Jalen Johnson.

The forward averaged career highs in points (16.1) and 3-point percentage (35.3%). Overall, Johnson has increased his scoring average from 5.6 last season to 16.1 this season. That is the second-largest increase among players to play at least 50 games in both seasons, trailing Cam Thomas. Johnson ranked in the bottom-10 in field goal percentage on all jumpers last season but saw an increase this year, going from 29% to 39%.

Since Landry Fields joined the front office in October 2020, Atlanta has signed a player to a rookie extension in each of the past three offseasons (Trae Young, Kevin Huerter, De'Andre Hunter and Onyeka Okongwu). Young is eligible to sign a three-year, $157 million extension up until Oct. 21.

Team needs:

Rim-protector and defensive depth on the perimeter Playmaker who can create shots for others Shooting off the bench Improved availability from the rotation forwards (Hunter, Bey, Johnson) Forward depth

Future draft assets rating: 6 out of 10

Atlanta received two first-round picks as part of the Murray trade, including the Lakers unprotected first in 2025. They also receive the least favorable 2027 first of New Orleans or Milwaukee. The Hawks will send their 2025 and 2027 picks to San Antonio as part of the trade that brought Murray to Atlanta in 2022. San Antonio also has the right to swap firsts in 2026. The first allowable year the Hawks can trade a first is 2029. Atlanta has six second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Atlanta has $166 million in salary and are $5.5 million below the luxury tax. They are also $9.5 million below the first apron. Available exceptions: $12.9 million non tax mid-level, $4.7 million biannual, veteran minimum and trade ($18, $3.7, $2.6 and $2.3 million).

CBA impact: Because Atlanta sent cash to Miami, they are now hard capped at the $189.5 million second apron. They are $20.3 million below the threshold.

Extension eligible: Young, Johnson and Clint Capela (as of July 6); Wesley Matthews; Fernando (as of Oct. 2)

Free agent status

Saddiq Bey | Bird | UFA Wesley Matthews | Non-Bird | UFA Trent Forrest | Early Bird | UFA Vit Krejci | Non-Bird | RFA Seth Lundy | Non-Bird | RFA Dylan Windler | Non-Bird | UFA Boston Celtics

Offseason transactions: Baylor Scheierman (first round), Anton Watson (second round)

Offseason priority: Extending Derrick White. The cost to keep the championship roster in Boston is set to get expensive. White -- who has two straight All-NBA Defensive second team honors -- is eligible to sign a four-year, $126.1 million extension, the maximum allowed.

Along with Jayson Tatum's potential super max extension, a new deal for White could add $72 million in salary for the 2025-26 season. The cost to keep both players is worth it.

White led all players in field goal percentage allowed as the contesting defender (a minimum of 800 shots) and ranked first in total blocks among guards this past season. He has missed only six regular-season games since the Celtics acquired him in February 2022.

More offseason priorities:

The $315 million Jayson Tatum super max. Tatum is eligible to sign the largest contract in NBA history. The extension begins in 2025-26. The one-year financial window before salaries increase. The Celtics will have two players on super max contracts (Tatum and Jaylen Brown) and a possible new contract for White in 2025-26. The cost to extend the contract of Sam Hauser?

Team needs:

Depth on the wings Backup point guard Frontcourt depth: Ready to play Kristaps Porzingis/Al Horford insurance Offensive paint presence Development jump from Payton Pritchard and Jordan Walsh

Future draft assets rating: 6 out of 10

Including their 2024 pick, the Celtics are allowed to trade as many as four first-round picks (also 2025, 2027 and 2031). They also can trade their 2026 first but not combined with either 2025 or 2027. San Antonio has the right to swap firsts in 2028 (top-one protected). The Celtics also will send Portland an unprotected 2029 first. The Celtics have six second-round picks available to trade.

Cash: $7.0 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Celtics finished the 2023-24 season in the second apron, and they are projected to remain there once the roster is filled out.

Exceptions: Veteran minimum and second-round

CBA impact: The Celtics are not allowed to aggregate contracts, acquire a player in a sign-and-trade, use the $5.2 million tax mid level exception, take back more money in a trade, send out cash or use a preexisting trade exception.

Extension eligible: White, Tatum and Jaden Springer (as of July 6); Hauser (as of July 9); Xavier Tillman (through June 30)

Free agent status

Xavier Tillman | Bird | UFA Oshae Brissett | Non-Bird Neemias Queta | Non-Bird | Restricted Luke Kornet | Bird Svi Mykhailiuk | Non-Bird Drew Peterson | Non-Bird | Restricted JD Davison | Early Bird  Brooklyn Nets

Offseason transactions: Bojan Bogdanovic (trade), Nic Claxton (agreed to a four-year, $100 million contract)

Offseason priority: What to do with Cam Johnson, Dorian Finney-Smith and Cam Thomas.

The Nets started a much-needed rebuild by trading Mikal Bridges to the Knicks for a haul of first-round picks. The attention now turns to the future of veterans Johnson and Finney-Smith.

Johnson has three years and $65 million left on his contract. Meanwhile, Finney-Smith has a $15.4 million team option in 2025-26 and could become a free agent. Brooklyn could increase their 15 future first-round picks if either are made available.

The Nets also have until Oct. 21 to extend Thomas, who averaged a career high 22.5 points this season. He also improved as a passer, jumping from five games with at least four assists last season to 26 such games this season. Because Thomas was drafted late in the first round, his free agent hold is $12.1 million. Signing him to a new contract greater than his hold would see Brooklyn lose cap space in the 2025 offseason.

The Nets could have over $80 million in room next offseason.

More offseason priorities:

Identifying a facilitator in the trade market, with Ben Simmons and Dennis Schroder becoming free agents in 2025.

Team needs:

A consistent playmaker Shooting Perimeter defenders and wing depth A starting-caliber playmaking wing Veteran and experienced leadership or players who have won at a high level

Future draft assets rating: 10 out of 10

The Nets signaled the rebuild by sending Mikal Bridges to New York but now are stacked with future draft first-round picks. Including four unprotected firsts from New York (2025, 2027, 2029 and 2031), Brooklyn also has the right to swap first with the Knicks in 2028. They also have a 2025 Milwaukee first if it falls outside of the top-4.

More important is the fact that the Nets now have control over their own first in 2025 and 2026. In a separate trade with Houston, Brooklyn received both prized draft assets that were sent as part of the James Harden trade. The Rockets still have the right to swap firsts with Brooklyn in 2027. Brooklyn has the least favorable 2024 first of Houston (if 11-30), Oklahoma City and Phoenix.

The Nets also have the least favorable of the 2029 Phoenix or Dallas first. The Nets also have the right to swap their own first or Philadelphia's (if the pick's range is within Nos. 9-30) with Phoenix or New York in 2028.

The Nets are allowed to trade up to 12 firsts and have a total of 15. Brooklyn also has 10 second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: After signing Claxton, Brooklyn has $151 million in salary. They have the flexibility to use any one of their four trade exceptions ($20.4 million, $11.9 million, $9.5 million, $6.8 million) and still remain below the $171 million tax threshold.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million mid level, $4.7 million biannual, second-round, veteran minimum and trade ($20.4, $11.9, $9.5 and $6.8 million)

CBA impact: Brooklyn has no trade restrictions in how it can add to its roster.

Extension eligible: Thomas, Simmons and Day'Ron Sharpe (as of July 6)

Free agent status

Dennis Smith | Non-Bird | UFA Lonnie Walker | Non-Bird | UFA Trendon Watford | Non-Bird | RFA Keon Johnson | Non-Bird | UFA Jacob Gilyard | Non-Bird  Charlotte Hornets

Offseason transactions: Tidjane Salaun (first round), KJ Simpson (second round), Reggie Jackson (trade)

Offseason priorities: Does Miles Bridges fit with the vision of Charlotte's new leadership?

There is no debate on Bridges' value on the court. In two of the past three seasons (he did not play in 2022-23), Bridges averaged at least 20 points per game. Last year he had career highs in rebounds (7.3) and steals (0.94).

He became the 11th player in NBA history to record each of his first two career 40-point games in consecutive games and became only the 2nd player in Hornets history with 45 points, 5 rebounds and 5 assists in a game.

The question on the next contract is not basketball related, but does Bridges fit how Charlotte builds out their roster under new GM Jeff Peterson and head coach Charles Lee.

Bridges was arrested in June 2022 for felony domestic violence. He would miss the 2022-23 and plead no contest to the charge. He was eventually suspended 30-games due to the domestic violence incident. Bridges was then charged in October 2023 with violating his probation and protection order. The charges were eventually dismissed due to "insufficient evidence to warrant prosecution" per a court filing obtained by ESPN.

More offseason priorities:

Is there a discussion to be had regarding LaMelo Ball's lack of availability? Ball has missed 134 games in the past four seasons. After the team went 10-20 after the February trade deadline, what direction does Peterson take with the current roster? Thirteen players under contract earning between $2 million and $16 million. Three NBA-caliber starters in Brandon Miller, Bridges and Ball. In his tenure in Brooklyn, Peterson was part of 20 different trades. However, that was a win-now team, not a rebuilding one such as Charlotte. Determining the value of guaranteeing Davis Bertans' remaining $11 million of his partially guaranteed deal to use as a trade aggregation. Bertans has an early termination option to guarantee at least $5.25 million of his $16 million deal.

Team needs:

A healthy and reliable Ball Catch-and-shoot threats Rim protection A replacement for Bridges if he is not signed Guards who defend Paint presence to rebound and push Wing depth and size

Future draft assets rating: 7 out of 10

The Hornets owe San Antonio a top-14-protected first in 2025. They are allowed to trade their own first starting in 2027. From two separate trades, Charlotte has a 2027 first from Dallas and Miami. The Mavericks' first is top-two protected. If the Heat convey their 2025 first to Oklahoma City, then the 2027 first owed to Charlotte is top-14 protected. The first is unprotected in 2028 if not conveyed in the prior season. They have ten second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Including first-round pick Tidjane Salaun, Charlotte has $105 million in guaranteed salary -- well below the $141 million salary cap. However, the future of Bridges and the decision on whether to waive Bertans will dictate how much flexibility the Hornets have in the offseason. Available exceptions: $8 million room and veteran minimum

CBA impact: Because Charlotte took salary back in the Jackson trade, they are now hard capped at the $189.5 million second apron.

Extension eligible: Tre Mann, Bertans and Cody Martin (as of July 6)

Free agent status

Miles Bridges | Bird | UFA Davis Bertans | Bird | Early termination option JT Thor | Team | Bird | UFA Amari Bailey | Non-Bird | UFA Chicago Bulls

Offseason transaction: Patrick Williams (agreed to a five-year $90 million contract), Josh Giddey (trade) and Matas Buzelis (first round)

Offseason priority: Improving a roster stuck in the middle.

After losing in back-to-back play-in games, Bulls president of basketball operations Arturas Karnisovas said change was needed to the roster. Karnisovas held true to his word, swapping out a two-time All-Defensive guard in Caruso for Giddey.

The addition of Giddey gives Chicago a playmaker but at the expense of one of the best perimeter defenders. Is Chicago taking a step back, or does Giddey balance out their roster better?

The next step is trading away the three years and $138 million owed to Zach LaVine -- it is the logical decision even if it means the return value does not equal that of the two-time All-Star. One example is trading LaVine's $43 million salary into multiple players.

Chicago also has a decision with free agent DeMar DeRozan. Keeping LaVine and then re-signing DeRozan not only puts Chicago in the luxury tax, but represents the status quo Karnisovas promised would not happen.

More offseason priorities:

The cost to bring back DeRozan. The future of LaVine, who has three years left on his contract. LaVine had season-ending right foot surgery in February. Is the contract considered a negative trade asset, or can the Bulls find value to improve the team? The Lonzo Ball rehab timeline. The guard has not played since January 2022.

Team needs:

3-point shooting Off-ball and on-ball defenders Bigs who can defend and rebound Bench scoring Forward depth A bench facilitator

Future draft assets rating: 4 out of 10

The Bulls owe a first-round pick to the Spurs that is top-10 protected in 2025 and top-eight protected in 2026 or 2027. They have a first-round pick from Portland that is top-14 protected over the next four years. If the first is not conveyed, the Trail Blazers will send a 2028 second. The Bulls have three second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Including first-round pick Matas Buzelis and the recently signed Patrick Williams, Chicago has $149 million in salary, well below the $171 million luxury tax threshold. However, if DeRozan is signed, Chicago could exceed the luxury tax for the first time since 2015-16. Available exceptions: $12.9 million mid level, $4.7 million biannual, trade ($2.8 million) and veteran minimum

CBA impact: There are no current apron restrictions for Chicago. However, they could be against the first apron if they re-sign DeRozan and do not trade LaVine. The $178.7 million first apron will get triggered if Chicago uses more than the $5.2 million non tax mid level exception.

Extension eligible: Ball and Giddey (as of July 6)

Free agent status

DeMar DeRozan | Bird | UFA Andre Drummond | Early Bird | UFA Javonte Green | Non-Bird | UFA Henri Drell | Non-Bird | UFA Adama Sanogo | Non-Bird | RFA Cleveland Cavaliers

Offseason transactions: Jaylon Tyson (first round)

Offseason priority: The future of Donovan Mitchell.

Mitchell's extension talks will dictate the offseason across the league. He has two years left on his contract ($34.9 million and $37.1 million) and the five-time All-Star is eligible to sign a four-year, $208.5 million extension starting on July 6. The 2025-26 player option would be replaced with a starting salary of $46.5 million. Mitchell could also sign a three-year, $151 million extension with a player option in the last season.

In 2027-28, Mitchell will have accrued 10 years of service, making him eligible to sign a five-year, $381 million contract. A selling point to Mitchell is that unlike teams that need to gut their rosters to trade for him, Cleveland can use its own players in a trade -- such as Darius Garland and Jarrett Allen -- to strengthen its lineup. Both players are former All-Stars, under contract for at least the next two seasons and have value if Cleveland was to make them available.

More offseason priorities:

The continued evaluation of the backcourt of Mitchell and Garland. Does the frontcourt of Allen and Evan Mobley complement each other? Mobley is eligible to sign a five-year, $215 million rookie extension. Allen, with two years left on his contract, can extend for an additional three seasons. Is restricted free agent Isaac Okoro seen as a priority? Cleveland could enter the luxury tax for the first time since 2018 if the forward is retained.

Team needs:

Long-term commitment from Mitchell Identifying whether the Mitchell/Garland and Allen/Mobley partnerships can work Consistency from the bench Backup big who can roll and shoot Better wing production Veterans who have been around high-level winning environments Craig Porter Jr. and Sam Merrill developing into dependable rotation players Continuing an elite defensive identity with the new coach

Future draft assets rating: 3 out of 10 

The Cavaliers can trade their 2031 first-rounder. From the Mitchell trade, they will send Utah unprotected firsts in 2025, 2027 and 2029. The Jazz also have the right to swap firsts with Cleveland in 2028. The Cavaliers can swap their own first in 2026, 2030 and 2031. Cleveland has eight second-rounders available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Including its own first-round pick, Cleveland is $10.5 million below the luxury tax. Cleveland has not paid the luxury tax since 2018, the last year LeBron James was on the roster. Available exceptions: $12.9 million non tax mid level, $4.7 million biannual and veteran minimum.

CBA impact: There are no apron restrictions, but Cleveland does need to weigh the cost of retaining Okoro. The $11.8 million qualifying offer for Okoro has Cleveland $5.6 million below the first apron. Cleveland will trigger the $178.7 million first apron if they use more than the $5.2 million non tax mid level exception.

Extension eligible: Mitchell, Mobley and Allen (as of July 6); Dean Wade (as of Sept. 27)

Free agent status

Damian Jones | Early Bird | UFA Isaac Okoro | Bird | RFA Tristan Thompson |Non-Bird| UFA Marcus Morris | Non-Bird | UFA Isaiah Mobley | Non-Bird | RFA Emoni Bates | Non-Bird | RFA Pete Nance | Non-Bird | UFA Dallas Mavericks

Offseason transactions: Melvin Ajinca (second round), Quentin Grimes (trade)

Offseason priority: Creating financial flexibility to re-sign Derrick Jones Jr. 

Mavericks GM Nico Harrison addressed the future of Jones Jr. in his season ending news conference. "I don't know how we're going to do it," Harrison said of re-signing Jones. "But he's priority 1-A [and] 1-B. I think he fits in with our team. He loves it here. We have to figure out the dynamics to get him to stay. But yeah, that's a priority. We'll do what we have to do to get it done."

The Mavericks created the financial flexibility to sign Jones Jr. when they traded Tim Hardaway Jr. to Detroit for Quentin Grimes. The Mavericks can now offer Jones Jr. the $12.9 non-tax midlevel exception and still remain below the $178.7 million first apron.

Jones Jr. started each postseason game and a career high 76 games in the regular season. He ranked in the top-10 in total defensive half-court matchups vs. 2024 All-Stars and effective field goal percentage allowed vs. 2024 All-Stars to defend 150-plus shots per Second Spectrum. He also recorded at least 50 blocks and 50 steals in a season for the first time in his career.

The question is not whether Dallas wants to sign Jones, but whether they can afford to.

Dallas also created a $16.1 million trade exception in the Hardaway Jr. trade to target a player like Klay Thompson. However, Golden State would need to cooperate in a sign-and-trade.

More offseason priorities:

Did the playoffs warrant extension talks for Jaden Hardy? The shooting guard has one year left on his contract and can extend for an additional four seasons. Did Dante Exum show enough this season to warrant securing his non-guaranteed $3.15 million contract? Exum's deal becomes fully guaranteed two days after the NBA draft. This season, he averaged 7.8 points per game and shot 49.1% from 3 across 55 games. His 19.8 minutes per game were his most since his rookie season in 2014-15.

Team needs:

A signed Jones Another playmaker besides Luka Doncic and Kyrie Irving to create shots for others Floor-spacing forwards 3-and-D perimeter depth Spacing development from at least one of the bigs, aside from Maxi Kleber

Future draft assets rating: 3 out of 10

Dallas owes Charlotte a top-two-protected first in 2027 and Brooklyn an unprotected first in 2029. The Thunder and Spurs have the right to swap firsts with the Mavericks in 2028 and 2030. Dallas is allowed to trade its own 2025 and 2031 firsts starting on the night of the draft. The Mavericks are also allowed to swap firsts in 2025, 2026 and 2031. Dallas has two seconds available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Mavericks are $9 million below the tax and more importantly $15.4 million below the first apron.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non tax mid level, $4.7 million biannual, second round, veteran minimum and trade ($16.1 and $4.0 million)

CBA impact: The Mavericks sent out money in the second-round trade with New York and are now hard capped at the $189.5 million second apron. Dallas is $26 million below the threshold.

Extension eligible: Hardy (as of July 6); Gafford (as of Oct. 1); Kleber (as of Sept. 8)

Free agent status

Derrick Jones Jr. | Non-Bird | UFA Markieff Morris | Early Bird | UFA Brandon Williams | Non-Bird | RFA Greg Brown III | Non-Bird | UFA Denver Nuggets

Offseason transactions: DaRon Holmes II (first round)

Offseason priority: Does the second apron impact Denver re-signing Kentavious Caldwell-Pope?

The Nuggets have a decision to make as it relates to Caldwell-Pope. They can re-sign their starting shooting guard and enter the second apron. Or they can let him walk and have Christian Braun replace him. The Nuggets have only the $5.2 million tax mid level exception if Caldwell-Pope does leave.

Denver GM Calvin Booth is prepared for Caldwell-Pope not to be back.

"Yeah, I think we have to look at everything, and the nature of free agency: He's unrestricted, so we can try to bring him back, but if he doesn't want to come back or chooses to go somewhere else, that's his prerogative," Booth told Mile High Sports.

"If [Braun] is to step into the starting lineup like probably projected, I think we'll be okay if KCP doesn't return."

Since the 2013-14 season, Caldwell-Pope has played in 96% of regular-season games. He has never missed more than four consecutive games. During the regular season, opponents shot 40.6% when Caldwell-Pope was the closest defender per Second Spectrum. That led the NBA among players to defend 500+ shots.

More offseason priorities:

The alignment between Booth and coach Michael Malone. Because of their financial limitations, Denver has prioritized building its depth through the draft: Christian Braun, Peyton Watson, Julian Strawther, Jalen Pickett, Hunter Tyson, Vlatko Cancar and Zeke Nnaji.  The Jamal Murray extension. The guard is eligible to sign a four-year, $208.5 million extension. Does the max contract of Michael Porter Jr. reflect his production on the court? Porter Jr. has three years, and $115 million left on his contract. He shot 37.1% from the field in the second-round playoff series loss to Minnesota.

Team needs:

3-point shooters Guards who can get downhill Bench depth at wing and in the frontcourt Value contributors Developmental growth from the youth on the roster A reserve facilitator

Future draft assets rating: 1 out of 10

The Nuggets are limited with draft assets. From the Aaron Gordon trade, Denver will send Orlando a 2025 top-five-protected first. The pick is also top-five protected in 2026 if not conveyed. Two years after that condition is met, Denver will send Oklahoma City a top-five-protected first. The pick is top-five protected in the next two years (2028 and 2029).

Finally, the Nuggets will send the Thunder another top-five-protected pick two years after the first is sent. An example is Denver sending its 2025 first to Orlando, then 2027 and 2029 firsts to the Thunder.

The Nuggets could trade their 2031 first, but there is no guarantee the receiving team receives it because of the pick protection in the preexisting years.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Denver has $170 million in salary and are right at the luxury tax threshold.

Available exceptions: $5.2 million tax mid level but only if Caldwell-Pope does not sign. Denver will have the veteran minimum if the guard is brought back.

CBA impact: The Nuggets will either be a second apron or a team slightly over the luxury tax. If Denver does exceed the apron, they will not be allowed to take more money back in a trade, aggregate contracts or send out cash.

Extension eligible: Murray (as of July 6); Gordon (as of Sept. 27); Porter Jr. (as of Sept. 29)

Free agent status

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope | Player | Bird Justin Holiday | Non-Bird | UFA DeAndre Jordan | Early Bird | UFA Vlatko Cancar | Bird Braxton Key | Non-Bird | UFA James Huff | Non-Bird | UFA Collin Gillespie | Early Bird | UFA Detroit Pistons

Offseason transactions: Ron Holland II (first round), Bobi Klintman (second round), Wendell Moore Jr. (trade), Tim Hardaway Jr. (trade)

Offseason priority: Cap space. The Pistons enter the offseason with two options: Overspend on free agents; or maximize cap space by trading for veterans that can help, but with the goal of acquiring trade assets.

The second scenario came to fruition when Detroit traded for the Hardaway Jr. expiring contract ($16.1 million) and two seconds from Dallas. Before the start of the second round of the draft, Detroit moved up sixteen spots to take back the contract of Moore Jr. from Minnesota.

Detroit still has $54 million in room after the trade and can continue adding veteran players to complement their young players. Keep in mind that Detroit is not allowed to preserve cap space into the regular season. As part of the CBA, Detroit is required to spend $126.9 million in salary (90% of the cap) by the first day of the regular season.

More offseason priorities:

The Cade Cunningham rookie extension. Is the smart play to reward him with a five-year, $225 million extension? The price point of matching a Simone Fontecchio offer sheet. Fontecchio will be a restricted free agent and a coveted 3-and-D player in the offseason. Detroit gave Utah the 32nd pick in the draft (essentially a late first) for Fontecchio. How does relinquishing that asset factor into cost analysis?

Team needs:

Shooting Interior defense A true veteran point guard Repetition of winning habits

Future draft assets rating: 5 out of 10

Detroit owes a first-round pick to New York that is top-12 protected in 2025, top-10 protected in 2026 and top-nine protected in 2027. The next available first-round pick the Pistons can trade is in 2029. They have no incoming first-rounders via trade. They have eight second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Detroit is in position to reshape its roster in free agency. Including the restricted free agent Fontecchio, Detroit has $54 million in room.

Available exceptions: $8 million room, second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: The Pistons have to spend $127 million (90%) of the $141 million salary cap by the first day of the regular season.

Extension eligible: Cunningham (as of July 6); Fournier

Free agent status

James Wiseman | Bird | UFA Simone Fontecchio | Early Bird | RFA Evan Fournier | Bird | UFA Malachi Flynn | Bird | UFA Jared Rhoden | Early Bird | UFA Taj Gibson | Non-Bird | UFA Golden State Warriors

Offseason transactions: Quinten Post (second round), Lindy Waters III (trade)

Offseason priority: The cost to retain free agent Klay Thompson. The Warriors enter the offseason balancing how to remain competitive but also financially conscious.

After spending $580 million in luxury tax penalties the past four seasons, including a record $177 million in 2023-24, Golden State is now operating on a budget.

"It's about being smart about it," GM Mike Dunleavy Jr. said recently. "It's more like if there's a point to go over the tax or one of the aprons, then we will do it. The most important thing to [Lacob] is winning. He's shown that. You just have to be careful with the new rules."

The decision of Thompson will play a role in what flexibility the Warriors have. If they waive Chris Paul, the Warriors then have the flexibility to re-sign Thompson, as well as operating below the luxury tax and both aprons. The Warriors would be $37 million below the tax threshold. The Paul $30 million contract is guaranteed if he is on the roster past June 30.

After not reaching an extension, Thompson is set to become a free agent for only the second time in his career.

"I think it's about what is the right thing that works for the franchise and the player and the role he is in," Dunleavy said. "Factoring all of those things in is what's most important, and that's what is taking place and what we're looking at. ... There are probably varying degrees of what that value is, but that's on me to figure out what the right amount is for our team."

Thompson averaged 19.8 points and shot 42.8% on 3-pointers in 14 games as a reserve. He ranked second on the team in points per game after the All-Star break, shooting 45.4% from the field and 41.2% on 3-pointers.

More offseason priorities:

The Stephen Curry extension. Curry is eligible to add one more season to the two he has left. The rookie extensions of Jonathan Kuminga and Moses Moody. Should the Warriors pay a premium for the upside of Kuminga? Evaluating the rotation of the bigs. Does Draymond Green continue to start at center, or would the team operate better with another big alongside him? Who aside from Trayce Jackson-Davis is in the rotation? 

Team needs:

Stretch 4 Versatile wings Backup point guard Elite catch-and-shoot threats Shooting off the bench Floor-spacing development from Kuminga Continued floor spacing from Green

Future draft assets rating: 5 out of 10

The Warriors are allowed to trade their 2025 first-round pick. They have a maximum of two firsts allowable to move (2025/2027 or 2026/2028) in the next seven years. Golden State can also trade its 2030 first but only if it falls between Nos. 1-20. The Wizards will receive the Warriors' 2030 first if between Nos. 21-30. They are allowed to swap their own first in the next seven years. The Warriors have four second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown:

The Warriors have $142 million in salary and have the resources to use the $12.9 million non tax mid level exception and take back money in a trade. They could however be pressed against the luxury tax if Thompson signs back.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non tax mid level, $4.7 million biannual, second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: Golden State sent cash to Portland in a second-round trade and are now hard capped at the $189.5 million second apron. Not including the non-guaranteed salary of Paul, they are $46 million below.

Extension eligible: Paul, Payton, Kuminga and Moody (as of July 6); Looney (as of July 9)

Free agent status

Klay Thompson | Bird | UFA Dario Saric | Non-Bird |UFA Usman Garuba | Non-Bird | UFA Lester Quinones | Early Bird |UFA Jerome Robinson | Non-Bird | UFA Houston Rockets

Offseason transactions: Reed Sheppard (first round), AJ Griffin (trade)

Offseason priority: The rookie extensions: Alperen Sengun and Jalen Green. Both Sengun and Green are eligible to sign rookie extensions worth up to $225 million over five years. Will the Rockets need to prioritize one over the other?

Sengun averaged career highs in points (21.1), rebounds (9.3), assists (5.0) and steals (1.2). He averaged 14.7 paint points this season, fifth most in the NBA. Sengun doubled his 3-point attempts this season but took a step back with his efficiency. The last time a center signed a rookie max extension was Bam Adebayo in 2020. Before the All-Star break, Green shot 41% from the field and 30.7% on 3-pointers.

During the Rockets' 11-game winning streak in March, Green averaged 30.2 points while shooting 50% from the field and 45% on 3-pointers. He was the youngest player to average 30 points over an 11-game winning streak, passing Bob McAdoo and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Stone has three years of work to evaluate Green, but during the first two years, Houston was playing out the string of games.

Green has improved defensively under Udoka, holding opponents to 0.87 points per chance when defending isolations. That ranked in the top 10 among players to defend at least 175 isolations per Second Spectrum. Last season, opponents had a 1.08 points per chance when running isolations vs. Green.

More offseason priorities:

Is the 2026 unprotected Brooklyn first, and right to swap in 2025 or 2027, in play if an All-Star or top starter becomes available? Improving the offense without losing the identity on the defensive end -- Houston ranked 10th in defensive efficiency and 20th offensive efficiency.

Team needs:

More willing playmakers and pass-first players Paint presence Rim-protectors, including having a healthy Steven Adams back Scoring efficiency development from Green Wing and backcourt depth

Future draft assets rating: 7 out of 10

The Rockets would rank higher, but there are still pick obligations from the 2019 Chris Paul trade owed to Oklahoma City in the next two seasons. The Thunder have the right to swap firsts with Houston (top-10 protected) next year and also a top-4 protected first in 2025. The Rockets have a 2027 unprotected first from Phoenix and the more favorable 2029 first from Dallas or Phoenix. They also have the right to swap their own first in 2029 with the less favorable of Dallas and Phoenix. Houston could also have the right to swap firsts with the 2025 Phoenix first that Brooklyn has. Houston has five second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Rockets have $159 million in salary and have flexibility below the luxury tax and both aprons to take back money in a trade. Available exceptions: $12.9 million non tax mid level, $4.7 million biannual and veteran minimum

CBA impact: The Rockets used a trade exception to acquire AJ Griffin and are now hard capped at the $178.7 million first apron. They are $16.8 million below.

Extension eligible: Green, Sengun and Jae'Sean Tate (as of July 6); Adams (as of Oct. 1)

Free agent status

Reggie Bullock | Non-Bird | UFA Aaron Holiday | Non-Bird | UFA Boban Marjanovic | Bird | UFA Nate Hinton | Non-Bird | UFA Jermaine Samuels | Non-Bird | UFA Nate Williams Jr. | Non-Bird | RFA Indiana Pacers

Offseason transactions: Pascal Siakam (agreed to a four-year $189.5 million contract), Johnny Furphy (second round), Tristen Newton (second round), Enrique Freeman (second round)

Offseason priority: The cost to retain free agent Obi Toppin.

The Pacers extended Toppin a $7.7 million qualifying offer, but a new contract could put Indiana in the luxury tax for the first time since 2005-06. The Siakam max contract leaves Indiana with a projected $20 million below the luxury tax.

Toppin averaged a career high 10.3 points and is one of 17 players this season to appear in all 82 games. Indiana selected Jarace Walker last June, and he could be a replacement if the price to retain Toppin is too expensive. 

More offseason priorities:

The extension options for T.J. McConnell and Andrew Nembhard. 

Future draft assets rating: 5 out of 10

The Pacers have their own first in 2025 but are unable to trade any others until 2028 at the earliest. They will send Toronto a top-14 protected first in 2026, which becomes a top-4 protected in 2027 not conveyed by that year. They have nine seconds available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Pacers are approaching the $171 million luxury tax after agreeing to a new contract with Siakam. Including the Toppin $7.7 million qualifying offer, Indiana has $159 million in salary.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non tax mid level, $4.7 million biennial, second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: There are currently no restrictions for Indiana. Indiana will trigger the $178.7 million first apron if they use more than the $5.2 million non tax mid level exception.

Extension eligible: McConnell, Jalen Smith and Isaiah Jackson (as of July 6); Nembhard (as of July 22)

Free agent status

Doug McDermott | Bird | UFA Jalen Smith | Bird Obi Toppin | Bird | RFA James Johnson | Early Bird | UFA Oscar Tshiebwe | Non-Bird | RFA Isaiah Wong | Non-Bird | UFA Quenton Jackson | Non-Bird | RFA LA Clippers

Offseason transaction: Cam Christie (second round)

Offseason priority: The future of Paul George. After declining his $48.7 million option, George is the best available free agent outside of LeBron James. George played his most games (74) since 2018-19 and shot a career-high 41% on 3-pointers. He and teammate Kawhi Leonard were the only players in the league to average 20 points and 1.5 steals and shoot 40% on 3-pointers this season.

"We hope Paul's decision is to be here," Clippers president of basketball operations Lawrence Frank said after the draft. "He's been awesome. He's been an All-Star. He's one of the best two-way players in the league. He's a terrific person. He's got a great family, so we hope he's here but also respect the fact that if he chooses to opt out, that's his choice. He's earned it and we'll see how things play out."

George is eligible to sign a four-year, $221 million contract with the Clippers or a four-year, $212 million contract with a team that has cap space (or in a sign-and-trade). He is also eligible to negotiate a no-trade clause with Los Angeles. If George does not return and James Harden is signed, the Clippers would have the $12.9 million non tax mid level exception.

They could also create a large trade exception if he were signed and traded to a team like Philadelphia. The 76ers would likely not agree to that proposal because it would then hard cap them at the first apron. There is also the scenario of a sign-and-trade to take back contracts, but that hard caps the Clippers at the $178.7 million first apron.

More offseason priorities:

The budget to retain Harden. Are the Clippers negotiating against themselves with the next contract? Would Harden, who has earned $341 million in his career, take less with another team if he feels slighted? The Terance Mann extension. The Clippers prioritized retaining the guard in the Harden trade. He is eligible starting in July to sign a four-year, $78.8 million extension. Mann is an unrestricted free agent in 2025 if there is no extension. Balancing the checkbook now and in the future. The Clippers have paid $377 million in tax penalties the past four seasons and are a projected second-apron team in 2024-25.

Team needs:

Depth at power forward and center: Floor spacers to limit double-teams on the Big 3 of Leonard, George and Harden (if the latter two return).  Backcourt shooting Turn second-year forward Kobe Brown into a rotational player Players who can give substantial minutes in the regular season to rest stars

Future draft assets rating: 1 out of 10

Because of prior trades, the earliest first the Clippers can trade is either 2030 or 2031 (but not both). The Clippers have two second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Clippers are projected to exceed $200 million in payroll if George and Harden return. They are a luxury tax team for a fifth straight season and once again a repeater tax team. If Paul does not return, they are below the tax if Harden returns. Available exceptions: $12.9 million non tax mid level, $4.7 million biannual exception, second round and veteran minimum. The non tax and biannual exception are not available if the Clippers are a first apron team.

CBA impact: For now, there are no restrictions on the Clippers. If they exceed the second apron, then the Clippers would not be allowed to aggregate contracts, take back more money and send out cash.

Extension eligible: Brandon Boston Jr. (through June 30); Bones Hyland, Mann, Ivica Zubac, Amir Coffey, P.J. Tucker, Norman Powell (as of July 6)

Free agent status

Paul George | Bird James Harden | Bird | UFA Mason Plumlee | Bird | UFA Daniel Theis | Non-Bird | UFA Kai Jones | Non-Bird | UFA Moussa Diabate | Early Bird | UFA Brandon Boston Jr. | Bird | UFA Xavier Moon | Early Bird | UFA Los Angeles Lakers

Offseason transactions: Dalton Knecht (first round), Bronny James (second round)

Offseason priority: After LeBron James opted out of his contract, he is eligible to sign a three-year, $162 million contract that would run through the 2026-27 season. The contract would be the largest in his career, and James would be allowed to negotiate a no-trade clause.

A three-year max salary for a 39-year-old would normally be deemed as a toxic contract, but James just played his most games since 2017-18 and continues to defy Father Time, shooting a career-high 41.6% on 3-pointers. He also earned All-NBA for a 20th consecutive season.

James could also go the short-term route and sign a two-year, $104 million contract. The second year would be a player option, allowing James to once again become a free agent next offseason.

There is a scenario where the Lakers could have access to the $12.9 million non tax mid level exception, but that would require them to clear salary in a trade or have James take a significant discount on his next contract.

More offseason priorities:

Do the Lakers have enough trade assets to make any big deals? Outside of James and Anthony Davis, the Lakers could have 10 players earning between $2 million to $19 million. The Lakers can also trade up to two firsts (2029, 2031) and have multiple years in which they can swap firsts (2026, 2028, 2029, 2030 and 2031). The cost to retain restricted free agent Max Christie. Barring a trade, the Lakers will go into the second apron if they sign or match an offer sheet for Christie.

Team needs:

Another ball handler who can create for others Crafty 3-and-D Players Defensive lengthy wings A playable and versatile backup center capable of finishing games with Davis Improved health from key reserves Defensive development from Austin Reaves

Future draft assets rating: 5 out of 10

The Lakers owe New Orleans a 2027 top-4 protected first to Utah. They will send Atlanta their 2025 first. Los Angeles can also trade a 2029, 2030 or 2031 first-round pick. The maximum allowed is two (2029 and 2031). The Lakers have four second-round picks available to trade.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Including first-round pick Dalton Knecht, the Lakers are over the $178.7 million first apron next season and are $4.8 million below the $189.6 million second apron.

Available exceptions: Second round and veteran minimum. 

CBA impact: There are no restrictions for the Lakers. However, if they take back more money in a trade they will trigger the $178.7 million first apron. They are also not allowed to exceed the $189.5 million first apron if they send cash, aggregate contracts and take back more money in a trade.

Free-agent status

LeBron James | Bird | UFA Spencer Dinwiddie | Non-Bird | UFA Max Christie | Early Bird | RFA Jaxson Hayes | Non-Bird | Player Taurean Prince | Non-Bird | UFA Colin Castleton | Non-Bird | RFA Skylar Mays | Non-Bird | UFA Harry Giles | Non-Bird | UFA Memphis Grizzlies

Offseason transactions: Zach Edey (first round) Jaylen Wells (second round), Cam Spencer (second round)

Offseason priority: The extension candidates. Marcus Smart has two years left on his current deal ($20.1 million and $21.6 million) and Memphis can extend his contract for an additional three seasons and up to $96.8 million. Smart played just 20 games this season, and missed 21 the previous season in Boston.

Starting on Oct. 1, Jaren Jackson Jr. can sign a three-year, $106.2 million extension that would start in 2026-27. If he doesn't sign an extension, he can become supermax eligible by being named All-NBA or winning Defensive Player of the Year next season.

Santi Aldama started a career-high 35 games, averaging 10.7 points and 5.7 rebounds. The deadline to extend Aldama, Smart and Jackson Jr. is Oct. 21.

Team needs:

Health A backup lead guard as injury insurance to Ja Morant and Smart GG Jackson and Vince Williams Jr. to develop into dependable role players on a winning team Shooting development from the core of the roster More veteran voices in the locker room

Future draft assets rating: 8 out of 10

The Grizzlies control their own first over the next seven years. They also have the right to swap their own 2026 first for the less favorable of Phoenix, Orlando and Washington. The Grizzlies also have the right to swap their own 2030 first for the less favorable one among the Suns and Wizards. Memphis has six second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Memphis declined the $14.8 million Luke Kennard and are now $7.8 million below the luxury tax.

Available exceptions: The Grizzlies have the $12.9 million non tax mid level and $4.7 million biannual if they decline the Kennard option or make a trade to move money. They also have the second round exception and veteran minimum.

CBA impact: Memphis currently cannot take back more in a trade.

Extension eligible: Kennard; Aldama and Williams (as of July 6); Smart (as of July 25); Jackson (as of Oct. 1)

Free agent status

Luke Kennard | Bird | UFA Yuta Watanabe | Non-Bird Jordan Goodwin | Non-Bird | UFA Miami Heat

Offseason transactions: Kel'el Ware (first round), Bam Adebayo (agreed to a three-year, $166 million extension), Pelle Larsson (second round)

Offseason priority: Navigating the future of Jimmy Butler. Heat president Pat Riley turned some heads when asked at the end of the 2023-24 season about the impending decision to extend Butler.

"That's a big decision on our part to commit those kinds of resources unless you have somebody who's going to be there and available every single night," Riley said in April. "That's the truth." Butler has failed to play 65 games or more in four straight seasons.

Butler is owed $48.8 million next season and holds a $52.4 million player option for the 2025-26 season. Starting July 7, he can sign a one-year, $58.6 million extension (keeping the current 2025-26 salary intact) or a two-year, $112.9 million extension (voiding the player option).

The Heat will need to decide whether rewarding Butler with a new contract is in their best interest long term and then analyze the fallout if he is not extended.

Team needs:

Roster consistency Facilitator at point guard Wing depth if Martin leaves in free agency Bench depth Defensive versatility at the wing: Development from Tyler Herro On-court cohesion between Herro and Rozier

Future draft assets rating: 3 out of 10

Because of the Terry Rozier trade, Miami is limited in first-round picks to send. The Heat owe a 2025 top-14 protected first to Oklahoma City that is unprotected in 2026 if not conveyed.

Once the first is sent, the Heat will then send Charlotte either a top-14 protected first in 2027 or an unprotected first in 2028. The earliest they can trade a first is in 2029. They have three second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Heat are right at the luxury tax and $3.7 million below the first apron. They will be a first apron team once the roster is filled out possible second apron team if they bring back Caleb Martin and Haywood Highsmith.

Available exceptions: Second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: There are currently no restrictions in Miami. The Heat however would not be allowed to take back more salary in a trade if it exceeds the first apron.

Extension eligible: Highsmith (through June 30); Martin and Duncan Robinson (as of July 6); Butler (as of July 7); Rozier (as of July 30)

Free agent status

Caleb Martin | Bird | UFA Thomas Bryant | Bird | UFA Kevin Love | Early Bird | UFA Delon Wright | Non-Bird | UFA Haywood Highsmith | Bird | UFA Jamal Cain | Early Bird | UFA Alondes Williams | Non-Bird | RFA Patty Mills | Non-Bird | UFA Cole Swider | Non-Bird | RFA Milwaukee Bucks

Offseason transactions: AJ Johnson (first round), Tyler Smith (second round)

Offseason priority: Player Development 101 with the bench. The Bucks could lose Malik Beasley, Jae Crowder and Patrick Beverley to free agency, because they are over the apron and cannot offer a starting salary of $4.0 million to each player.

How Milwaukee replaces the 23.5 points per game and 110 starts that group made this season will come down to two options. The first is signing players to the one-year veterans minimum.

The downside of that strategy would be having to go through the same process next offseason. The second option would be making a concerted effort in developing some of their young players -- AJ Green, MarJon Beauchamp, Chris Livingston, Andre Jackson Jr. -- into 15-to-20-minute players. Milwaukee also added AJ Johnson and Tyler Smith in the draft.

Thanks to all the injuries in the playoffs, Jackson played 25 minutes in the Game 4 loss to the Pacers. He was the only Milwaukee player to play at least five minutes and have a positive plus-minus. Green averaged 13.9 minutes after the All-Star break and finished the regular season shooting 40.8% on 3-pointers.

More offseason priorities

A full training camp under Doc Rivers. Milwaukee's is a win-now roster that features Damian Lillard and Giannis Antetokounmpo but with a limited body of work to evaluate under the veteran coach. The Bobby Portis extension. Portis is eligible to extend for an additional four seasons. Is Milwaukee comfortable paying starter-type money to one of the top reserves? Portis has a player option and could be a free agent in 2025. Starter Brook Lopez is on an expiring contract.

Team needs

Depth at every position Two out of the four young players (Beauchamp, Livingston, Jackson and Green) to develop into 15-to-20-minute contributors Defensive mobility and versatility at the center position A point-of-attack lead defender A hustling, spark-plug type of player

Future draft assets rating: 1 out of 10

The trades to acquire Jrue Holiday in 2020 and Damian Lillard last season have depleted the Bucks' future first-round picks. The Bucks will send their 2025 first-round pick to New Orleans (if the pick's range is within Nos. 1-4) or New York (if within Nos. 5-30). The Pelicans also have the right to swap firsts in 2026 and have an unprotected 2027 first from Milwaukee. The Trail Blazers have the right to swap firsts in 2028 and 2030. Portland will also receive an unprotected first in 2029. The Bucks have one second-round pick available to trade (2031).

Cash: $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: For a fifth straight season, Milwaukee is projected to be a luxury tax team. The Bucks have $183 million in salary and are $12 million over the tax threshold. They are over the first apron and will exceed the second once their roster is filled out.

Available exceptions: Second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: Milwaukee is a projected second-apron team. The Bucks are not allowed to aggregate contracts, acquire a player in a sign-and-trade, use the $5.1 million tax midlevel exception, take back more money and send out cash in a trade.

Extension eligible: Portis (as of July 6); Pat Connaughton (as of July 18)

Free agent status

Thanasis Antetokounmpo | Bird Malik Beasley | Non-Bird | UFA Jae Crowder | Bird | UFA Patrick Beverley| Non-Bird | UFA TyTy Washington | Non-Bird | UFA Minnesota Timberwolves

Offseason transactions: Rob Dillingham (first round) and Terrence Shannon Jr. (first round)

Offseason priority: The bench. Minnesota can get away with playing an eight-man rotation in the playoffs, but will need to address its regular-season depth in the offseason.

Not including Nickeil Alexander-Walker and Naz Reid, the Timberwolves' reserves are Leonard Miller and Josh Minott.

Minnesota did add Rob Dillingham and Terrence Shannon Jr. and have bird rights on free agents Kyle Anderson, Monte Morris and Jordan McLaughlin. The Timberwolves are allowed to exceed the luxury tax and apron to re-sign their own free agents but would pay a significant financial penalty if the contract is for more than the veteran minimum exception.

Anderson had his minutes decrease in the postseason (from 22.6 to 14.2) and averaged only 3.8 points. But he was productive in the conference finals, averaging 20 minutes, 7.5 points and 3.5 assists.

More offseason priorities

How much does the stalemate within ownership impact basketball operations? Current owner Glen Taylor and minority owners Marc Lore and Alex Rodriguez are going to mediation over control. Minnesota is projected to have the highest payroll in franchise history, will pay a luxury tax that could exceed $75 million, and is a second-apron team. Does it make sense exploring a Rudy Gobert extension? The NBA Defensive Player of the Year has two years left, including a player option in the last year. Both sides could agree to eliminate the player option and then extend at a lower salary. This option helps Minnesota financially in 2025 and also gives Gobert financial security.

Team needs

Shooters A rotation-capable combo forward An insurance big who can rebound at a high level

Future draft assets rating: 1/2 out of 10

The Timberwolves sent San Antonio an unprotected 2031 first-round pick and also the right to swap firsts in 2030. The Spurs trade combined with the picks sent out in the Gobert trade to Utah now leaves Minnesota with no first-round picks available to trade. The Timberwolves have three second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.0 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Timberwolves are projected to exceed $200 million in salary, the most in franchise history, and are expected to pay the luxury tax for only the second time since 2007-08. The penalty is expected to exceed $90 million.

Available exceptions: Second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: The Timberwolves are over the second apron. They are not allowed to take back more money in a trade, aggregate contracts and send out cash.

Extension eligible: Gobert (as of July 6); Minott (as of July 22)

Free agent status

Kyle Anderson | Early Bird | UFA Jordan McLaughlin | Bird | UFA Luka Garza | Early Bird | UFA Daishen Nix | Non-Bird | UFA Monte Morris | Bird | UFA T.J. Warren | Non-Bird | UFA New Orleans Pelicans

Offseason transactions: Yves Missi (first round), Antonio Reeves (second round), Dejounte Murray (trade)

Offseason priority: Is Brandon Ingram part of the Pelicans' future? The four-year, $208.5 million Ingram extension should be an easy negotiation. Ingram -- who has one All-Star appearance -- is only 26 years old and has averaged at least 20 points, 4 rebounds and 4 assists in the past five seasons. He shot a career-best 53% on 2-pointers this season and ranked fifth in midrange field goals per game.

But the $50 million average salary on the extension would come with significant risk. Ingram has missed 154 games since the 2016-17 season and played just 55, 45 and 64 games in the past three seasons.

The Pelicans have to ask whether paying a combined $145 million to Ingram, Zion Williamson, Murray and CJ McCollum in 2025-26 is smart business. New Orleans would be top-heavy in salary, especially if Trey Murphy III is also extended in the offseason.

The bigger risk, however, is the distraction of Ingram coming back on an expiring contract if extension talks stall. The Pelicans are in a position to either pay Ingram or look for trade suitors, which could have a domino effect on the roster considering there is a void at center.

More offseason priorities

How does New Orleans fill the void at center? Starter Jonas Valanciunas is a free agent, and a new contract could put the Pelicans in the tax. Should the Pelicans target a starting center under contract with their draft capital accumulated in prior trades? Or is the smart approach to explore trading for a facilitator? The Murphy rookie extension.

Team needs

Rim-protecting starting center capable of closing games Shooting Consistent offensive structure, discipline, basketball IQ improvement

Future draft assets rating: 7 out of 10

The Pelicans control their own firsts over the next seven years. They will send the least favorable of their own or New Orleans 2027 first to Atlanta. The Pelicans also have a top-four first in 2025 from the Bucks and the right to swap with them in 2026. New Orleans has two seconds available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Murray trade now has the Pelicans with $167 million in salary, $4.7 million below the luxury tax.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non tax, $4.7 million biannual second-round, veteran, and $5.2 million trade

CBA impact: The Pelicans are hard capped at the $178.7 million second apron.

Dates to watch

Extension eligible: Jose Alvarado, Ingram and Murphy (as of July 6); CJ McCollum (as of Sept. 26)

Free agent status

Naji Marshall | Bird | UFA Jonas Valanciunas | Bird | UFA Cody Zeller | Non-Bird | UFA Dereon Seabron | Early Bird | UFA New York Knicks

Offseason transactions: Mikal Bridges (trade), OG Anunoby (agreed to a five-year, $212.5 million contract), Pacome Dadiet (first round), Tyler Kolek (second round), Kevin McCullar Jr. (second round), Ariel Hukporti (second round)

Offseason priority: Isaiah Hartenstein and the second apron.

The Bridges trade, as reported, upgraded the roster but put New York in a precarious position. Because they took more money in the trade, the Knicks are hard capped at the $178.7 million first apron.

Including a projected new contract for Anunoby, New York is $9 million below the apron and with four roster spots. To navigate around the restriction, the Knicks could sign their second-round picks -- Kolek and McCullar -- and use the balance of the money on two veteran minimums.

To navigate around the first apron, New York could expand the deal and sign-and-trade a player like Precious Achiuwa. By sending out more salary, New York would then have $20 million in flexibility.

If the trade is not expanded, the first apron restriction could cost Hartenstein. Playing a career high in minutes, Hartenstein joined Anthony Davis and Victor Wembanyama as the only players with 85 blocks and 85 steals in a season. He became the first player since Moses Malone in 1982 to record 12 offensive rebounds and 5 assists in a playoff game, according to ESPN Stats & Information.

The loss of Hartenstein could be significant when you consider the durability issues of Mitchell Robinson. Robinson tied a career low in 31 games played this past season and underwent surgery twice on his left ankle.

If New York does create flexibility, the maximum they can offer Hartenstein is four years, $72.5 million.

More offseason priorities

Is Brunson willing to take a discount with his next contract? He is eligible to sign a four-year, $157 million extension in July. If he waits until the 2025 offseason, the contract increases to $270 million. The options to extend Julius Randle

Team needs

Health More controlled usage of the starters' minutes Frontcourt depth, including a stretch 4 Developmental depth on the wings, including reserve 3-and-D players Playmaking guard

Future draft assets rating: 3 out of 10

New York went all-in with the Bridges trade at the cost of their future first-round picks. The Knicks will send Brooklyn their 2025, 2027, 2029 and 2031 unprotected firsts. The Nets also have the right to swap firsts in 2028. The Knicks have a 2025 protected first from Detroit and Washington that is available to trade. The Pistons' first is top-13 protected in 2025, top-11 protected in 2026 and top-nine protected in 2027. The Wizards first is top-10 protected in 2025 and top-eight protected in 2026. New York has 12 seconds available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: For the moment, the Knicks triggered the $178.7 million first apron in the trade to acquire Bridges. The trade however is not finalized and could expand to add additional salary. Including first-round pick Pacome Dadiet, New York is $9.3 million below the first-apron. They have four roster spots available.

Available exceptions: Second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: The Knicks are now hard capped at the $178.7 million first apron.

Extension eligible: Sims (as of July 9); Brunson and Robinson (as of July 12); Randle (as of Aug. 3); Bridges (as of Oct. 1)

Free agent status

Alec Burks | Bird | UFA Isaiah Hartenstein | Early Bird | UFA Shake Milton | Non-Bird | UFA Precious Achiuwa | Bird | RFA DaQuan Jeffries | Non-Bird | UFA Charlie Brown Jr. | Non-Bird | UFA Jacob Toppin | Non-Bird | RFA Duane Washington Jr. | Non-Bird | UFA Oklahoma City Thunder

Offseason transaction: Alex Caruso (trade), Nikola Topic (first round), Dillon Jones (first round) and Ajay Mitchell (second round)

Offseason priority: What is the best way to use cap space? Because of future extensions with Jalen Williams, Chet Holmgren and Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, there is a two-year window to maximize financial flexibility. New contracts with a significant raise for Williams and Holmgren would begin in 2026, and for Gilgeous-Alexander the following year.

Having flexibility, however, does not mean Oklahoma City is set to go on a spending spree in free agency. The Thunder have prioritized building their roster through the draft, trades and low-risk free agent signings.

The cautious approach in free agency, however, is not an indication Oklahoma City will be dormant. For example, last summer the Thunder used cap space to take back the contract of Davis Bertans, but with the incentive to move up two spots in the draft's first round. They would go on and select Cason Wallace.

One approach the Thunder could go is to reward Aaron Wiggins and Isaiah Joe with new contracts. The pair recently had their team options declined.

Team needs

Depth on the wing Insurance policy at the center position A rebounding rim-protector who can play alongside Holmgren for stretches A backup at the 2 or 3 positions who can shoot the ball Continued spacing development from Luguentz Dort Experienced veterans

Future draft assets rating: 10 out of 10

The Thunder have 13 future first-round picks and 20 second-rounders. The most valuable first-round picks include a 2026 unprotected first from the Clippers and a 2026 top-four-protected first from Houston. OKC also has the right to swap firsts with the Clippers in 2025 and 2027.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: Including both first-round picks, Oklahoma City has $112 million in salary and a projected $29 million in room.

Available exceptions: $8 million room midlevel and veteran minimum

CBA impact: The Thunder have to spend $15 million by the first day of the regular season. The Thunder took back cash in separate trades and cannot exceed the $189.5 million second apron.

Extension eligible: Caruso (as of July 6); Jaylin Williams (as of July 19); Joe (as of Oct. 16)

Free agent status

Isaiah Joe | Early Bird | UFA Gordon Hayward | Bird | UFA Mike Muscala | Non-Bird | UFA Aaron Wiggins | Bird | Restricted Olivier Sarr | Early Bird | UFA Lindy Waters III | Team | Bird Keyontae Johnson | Non-Bird | Restricted Orlando Magic

Offseason transactions: Tristan da Silva (first round)

Offseason priority: Maximizing cap space within a two-year window.

Possible extensions for Franz Wagner and Jalen Suggs this offseason and All-Star Paolo Banchero next July leaves Orlando with a two-year window to maximize cap space.

The Magic project to have at least $52 million in room, and the goal is to figure out how to improve the offense without taking away their identity on defense or impeding the development of their young players, all while maintaining their financial flexibility in the future.

The Magic ranked 28th in assists this season with Suggs, Anthony Black and Markelle Fultz each starting at point guard. Orlando continued to rank as one the worst 3-point shooting teams, evident in the loss to the Cavaliers. No player on the roster shot greater than 40% from deep, and starting shooting guard Gary Harris is a free agent.

More offseason priorities

The rookie extensions for Franz Wagner and Suggs. The development of the 2023 lottery picks: Black and Jett Howard.

Team needs

Shooting Point guard who can organize the offense and control pace Injury insurance at center Continuity and carryover of an elite defense Spacing development from Banchero and Franz Wagner Wing depth

Future draft assets rating: 8 out of 10

The Magic have their own first over the next seven years. They also have the right to swap firsts. From the Aaron Gordon trade in 2021, Denver will send a 2025 top-five-protected first. The first is top-five-protected in 2026 and 2027 if not conveyed in a prior season. Orlando has the right to swap its 2026 first for the less favorable of Phoenix and Washington. Orlando has 12 second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: After declining the team options of Joe Ingles and Moritz Wagner, Orlando can create up to $52 million in room.

Available exceptions: $8 million room midlevel, second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: Because of the minimum salary rule, Orlando has to spend 90% of the $141 million salary cap by the first day of the regular season.

Extension eligible: Franz Wagner, Suggs and Isaac (as of July 6); Caleb Houstan (as of July 10); Wendell Carter Jr. (as of Oct. 1)

Free agent status

Goga Bitadze | Early Bird | UFA Markelle Fultz | Bird | UFA Gary Harris | Bird | UFA Joe Ingles | UFA | Non-Bird Chuma Okeke | Bird  Moritz Wagner |  Bird | UFA Kevon Harris | Early Bird | UFA Trevelin Queen | Non-Bird | RFA Admiral Schofield | Early Bird | UFA Philadelphia 76ers

Offseason transactions: Jared McCain (first round), Adem Bona (second round) Offseason priority: Identifying players who complement Tyrese Maxey and Joel Embiid.

Signing a player such as Paul George to a max contract starting at $49 million would require the 76ers renounce all their free agents and then build out the roster with the remaining cap space, the $8 million room midlevel exception and the veteran minimum exception.

Chasing an All-Star free agent is not the only option. Philadelphia could look to retain its own free agents (Kyle Lowry, Nicolas Batum, De'Anthony Melton and Kelly Oubre Jr., for example) and then split up the near $60 million in room among a group of free agents that includes Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, Klay Thompson, DeMar DeRozan, Miles Bridges, and Tyus Jones.

One scenario that should not be overlooked is Philadelphia targeting an All-Star in a trade. Besides cap space and the ability to use their own free agents in a sign-and-trade, the 76ers have five tradable firsts and multiple pick swaps available.

More offseason priorities

The Maxey contract. Because of his low free agent hold, expect the 76ers to utilize cap space first and then sign him. Besides Maxey, which free agents of their own are a priority? Oubre, Lowry and Batum all add value to the roster. Tobias Harris could be used in a sign-and-trade. The Embiid extension. The 2022-23 MVP is eligible to extend his contract for three seasons and $193.5 million.

Team needs

Depth across the board Perimeter defenders who can preserve Embiid in help scenarios An All-Star-talent wing capable of being a playmaker A quality insurance policy at the backup center position

Future draft assets rating: 6 out of 10

Trading James Harden to the Clippers last season restored some of the draft equity Philadelphia had lost in prior trades. The 76ers can trade their 2024 first-round pick starting the night of the draft. They also have the least favorable 2026 first from Oklahoma City, Houston (if the pick's range is within Nos. 5 to 30) and the Clippers.

The Sixers also are owed an unprotected first from the Clippers in 2028 and have the right to swap firsts with them in 2029 (if within Nos. 4 to 30). In total, Philadelphia can trade up to five firsts starting in late June. The 76ers owe the Thunder a first-round pick from the Al Horford trade in 2020. The pick is top-six protected in 2025 and top-four protected in 2026. Two years after the draft obligation is met to the Thunder, Philadelphia will then send a top-eight-protected first to Brooklyn. The 76ers have five second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The 76ers are in the driver's seat with cap space this offseason, but creating financial flexibility does come at a significant cost. Philadelphia could create up to $65 million in space, but that would require the 76ers to renounce all their free agents except Maxey, waive their non-guaranteed contracts and trade first-round pick McCain without taking back any salary. They have five trade exceptions that are no longer valid once they dip below the salary cap.

Available exceptions: $8 million room, second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: There are no trade restrictions. Philadelphia has to spend at least $127 million of the salary cap by the first day of the regular season. The Sixers currently have $67 million in salary for 2024-25.

Extension eligible: Harris, Buddy Hield, De'Anthony Melton, KJ Martin and Robert Covington (through June 30); Embiid (as of July 18)

Free agent status

Tyrese Maxey | Bird | RFA Tobias Harris | Bird | UFA De'Anthony Melton | Bird | UFA Nicolas Batum | Bird | UFA Kyle Lowry | Non-Bird | UFA Cameron Payne | Non-Bird | UFA Robert Covington | Bird | UFA Buddy Hield | Bird | UFA K.J. Martin | Bird | UFA Kelly Oubre Jr. | Non-Bird | UFA Mo Bamba | Non-Bird | UFA Jeff Dowtin | Non-Bird | UFA Terquavion Smith | Non-Bird | UFA Phoenix Suns

Offseason transactions: Ryan Dunn (first round), Oso Ighodaro (second round), Royce O'Neale (agreed to a four-year, $44 million contract), and Bol Bol (free agent)

Offseason priority: Kevin Durant's extension. Durant, 35, has two years left on his contract ($51.2 million and $54.7 million) and is eligible to sign a one-year extension, which would pay him $59.7 million in 2026-27, when the two-time NBA champion turns 38. Because of the Over-38 rule, one year is the maximum that Phoenix can offer.

Durant played 75 games this season, his most since 2018-19. Durant averaged 27.3 points per game, the sixth most in a player's 16th season or later in NBA history, per ESPN Stats & Information. He is one of two players (along with LeBron James) averaging 25 points, 50% shooting from the field, and 40% shooting on 3-pointers this season.

More offseason priorities

Bargain shopping in free agency to build out the bench. The Suns have the veteran minimum exception available.

Team needs

Facilitator High-level rotational players and frontcourt depth Defensive development and consistency from the starting backcourt Durant, Beal and Devin Booker to play like max-contract players Stars to buy in and promote coach Mike Budenholzer's vision

Future draft assets rating: 1 out of 10

Phoenix has its own firsts in 2026, 2028 and 2030, but the low ranking is a result of its inability to control its own first until 2031. The Suns owe Brooklyn unprotected firsts in 2025, 2027 and 2029. The Nets also have the right to swap their own first or Philadelphia's (if the pick's range is within Nos. 9-30) with Phoenix in 2028. The Wizards have the right to swap firsts in 2026 (if within Nos. 1-8), 2028 (if within Nos. 1-8) and 2030.

Orlando or Memphis then has the right to swap its 2026 first with the less favorable of Phoenix's and Washington's. The Wizards also have the right to swap the least favorable of the Nets', Suns' and 76ers' firsts in 2028. Memphis also has the right to swap the less favorable of Phoenix's and Washington's in 2030. The Suns have three second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Suns enter the offseason with $212million in salary, the biggest payroll of any NBA team. They have a projected tax penalty of $116 million

Available exceptions: Veteran minimum and second round

CBA impact: Phoenix will remain a second-apron team. The Suns are not allowed to use any preexisting trade exception, send out cash, aggregate contracts or take back more money in a trade. They also are not allowed to acquire a player via a sign-and-trade.

Extension eligible: Durant (as of July 8); Jusuf Nurkic (as of July 6)

Free agent status

Drew Eubanks | Non-Bird Eric Gordon | Non-Bird | Player Isaiah Thomas | Non-Bird | UFA Josh Okogie | Early Bird | UFA Thaddeus Young | Non-Bird | UFA Udoka Azubuike | Non-Bird | UFA Saben Lee | Non-Bird | RFA Ish Wainright | Non-Bird | RFA Portland Trail Blazers

Offseason transactions: Deni Avdija (trade), Donovan Clingan (first round)

Offseason priority: The veterans. The Trail Blazers are in the unique position of rebuilding in the Western Conference with the fourth-youngest roster but also having veterans such as Anfernee Simons, Jerami Grant, Robert Williams III, Deandre Ayton and Matisse Thybulle under contract next season. Those six players would have trade value if Portland makes them available.

Ayton averaged 22.7 points and 12.5 rebounds after the All-Star break. Williams has one of the best contracts ($12.4 million and $13.2 million over the next two seasons) and is a Defensive Player of the Year candidate when healthy (he missed all but six games in 2023-24). He should be expendable with Portland drafting center Donovan Clingan. Grant averaged 21 points, his most since 2020-21, and has four years and $133 million left on his contract.

More offseason priorities

The extension options for Jabari Walker

Team needs

More shooting Playmakers for the team Spacing development from Scoot Henderson and Toumani Camara A healthy roster that can get consistent reps with each other Perimeter defensive improvement across the board Understanding winning habits

Future draft assets rating: 7 out of 10

As part of the Avdija trade, Portland will send Washington the second-most-favorable 2029 first of its own, Boston's and Milwaukee's. The Blazers also have the right to swap firsts with the Bucks in 2028 and 2030. Portland still owes Chicago a first-round pick that has top-14 protection through 2028. The Blazers have eight second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Trail Blazers went under the luxury tax and first-apron with the Malcolm Brogdon trade to Washington. Portland is now $4.1 million below the tax and $10 million below the first apron. They have a $8.7 million trade exception.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non-tax midlevel, $4.7 million biannual, second round, veteran minimum and trade ($8.7 million).

CBA impact: There are no trade restrictions on Portland.

Extension eligible: Simons (as of July 6); Walker (as of July 13); Ayton (as of July 18); Williams (July 30)

Free agent status

Moses Brown | Non-Bird | UFA Ibou Badji | Non-Bird | RFA Justin Minaya | Early Bird | UFA Ashton Hagans | Non-Bird | UFA Sacramento Kings

Offseason transaction: Malik Monk (agreed to a four-year, $79 million extension), Devin Carter (first round), Jalen McDaniels (trade) Offseason priority: The De'Aaron Fox extension. Fox has two years left on his contract ($34.8 million and $37.1 million) and Sacramento has the option to add three more seasons and up to $166 million in new money. The $51.2 million first-year salary of the extension would start in 2026-27. If Fox is named All-NBA this season, he'd be eligible for a four-year, $267.5 million extension.

If Fox does not sign an extension by Oct. 21, he would be eligible to sign a four-year, $229 million extension next offseason or a five-year, $346 million supermax extension if he is named All-NBA in 2024-25. Fox averaged a career-high 26.6 points but earned only nine All-NBA votes.

More offseason priorities

Evaluating whether the current roster has plateaued. The Kings declined from 48 wins in 2022-23 to 46 wins this past season, losing in the play-in tournament. The same starting five returns from the past two seasons.

Team needs

Backup big Keegan Murray to take a development step  A return to form from Kevin Huerter Defensive leadership

Future draft assets rating: 6 out of 10

The Kings owe Atlanta a first-round pick that is top-12 protected in 2025 and top-10 protected in 2026. As a result, the first allowable first-round pick is two years after the pick to Atlanta is conveyed. Including the 2024 pick, Sacramento is allowed to trade four first-round picks. The Kings are also allowed to swap firsts in five seasons (2027 to 2031). The Kings have five second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Kings went under the luxury tax when they sent Davion Mitchell and Sasha Vezenkov to Toronto. Sacramento is $7.4 million below the tax.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non-tax midlevel, $4.7 million biannual, trade and veteran minimum.

CBA impact: There are no trade restrictions for Sacramento.

Extension eligible: Fox and Chris Duarte (as of July 6); Huerter (as of Oct. 1)

Free agent status

Alex Len | Bird | UFA JaVale McGee | Non-Bird | UFA Kessler Edwards | Early Bird | UFA Jordan Ford | Early Bird | UFA Jalen Slawson | Non-Bird | UFA San Antonio Spurs

Offseason transaction: Stephon Castle (first round), Juan Nunez (second round), Harrison Ingram (second round)

Offseason priority: Should San Antonio accelerate the rebuild at the cost of draft capital?

Year 2 of the Victor Wembanyama era begins in San Antonio with a heightened awareness that winning 22 games and finishing at the bottom of the Western Conference is not acceptable with a player of his caliber on the roster.

How the roster improves will come down to whether management is willing to accelerate the rebuild this offseason and not next summer, when the Spurs could have up to four first-round picks and $50 million in cap space. The Spurs have eight tradable first-round picks over the next seven years.

Offensively, the Spurs struggled shooting the ball with Wembanyama at both power forward and center, shooting 34.7% on 3-pointers. The Spurs as a team ranked 28th in 3-point percentage and were 5-20 when they attempted at least 40 3-pointers.

Team needs

Shooters to complement Wembanyama Bench upgrades across the board Perimeter defenders in the starting lineup Acquiring a three-level scorer and a roll-scoring ball handler Competitive veterans Energy reserves Spacing development from Jeremy Sochan

Future draft assets rating: 10 out of 10

The Spurs rank behind only Brooklyn, Oklahoma City and Utah in most first-round picks over the next seven years. San Antonio is owed unprotected first-round picks from Atlanta in 2025 and 2027. The Spurs can also swap with the Hawks in 2026. San Antonio is also owed a first-round pick from Charlotte (top-14 protected in 2025, or else two second-round picks) and Chicago (top-eight protected in 2026 and 2027).

San Antonio also has the right to swap firsts with Boston in 2028 (top-one protected) and Dallas (or Minnesota) in 2030 (unprotected). San Antonio has also a 2031 unprotected first from Minnesota. The Spurs have 18 second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Spurs could have $27 million in room but would need to waive the contracts of Devonte' Graham and Charles Bassey. Graham has a $12.7 million salary that is guaranteed for $2.8 million. Bassey's $2.5 million salary is non-guaranteed.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non-tax midlevel, $4.7 million biannual, second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: There are no trade restrictions for the Spurs. By the first day of the regular season, San Antonio must spend $127 million in salary.

Extension eligible: Graham (as of July 6)

Free agent status

Cedi Osman | Bird | UFA Sandro Mamukelashvili | Bird | RFA Dominick Barlow | Early Bird | UFA David Duke Jr. | Non-Bird | UFA Toronto Raptors

Offseason transactions: Scottie Barnes (agreed to a five-year, $225 million extension), Immanuel Quickley (agreed to a five-year, $175 million contract), Ja'Kobe Walter (first round), Jonathan Mogbo (second round), Jamal Shead (second round), Ulrich Chomche (second round), Davion Mitchell (trade), Sasha Vezenkov (trade)

Offseason priority: Bruce Brown. The Raptors elected to exercise the $23 million team option on Brown. By doing so, Toronto has a valuable expiring contract to use in a trade. Brown averaged 9.6 points but shot only 31.7% on 3-pointers.

Team needs

Point guard depth Bench scoring at the wings Backup big Quickley signed to a reasonable deal Off-ball offensive development from Barnes

Future draft assets rating: 7 out of 10

The Raptors have their own first in the next seven years and a 2026 top-four-protected first from Indiana. The first is top-four protected in 2027 if not conveyed. Toronto has six second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Raptors elected to stay over the salary cap when they exercised the $23 million Brown team option. The new Quickley contract now has Toronto with $160 million in salary.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non-tax midlevel, trade ($10.2 million), second round and veteran minimum

CBA impact: The Raptors are hard capped at the $189.5 million second apron. They took more money in the trade with Sacramento.

Extension eligible: Barnes (as of July 6); Chris Boucher (as of July 7)

Free agent status

Bruce Brown | Non-Bird | Team Jordan Nwora | Bird | UFA Gary Trent Jr. | Bird | UFA Immanuel Quickley | Bird | RFA Garrett Temple | Non-Bird | UFA Utah Jazz

Offseason transactions: Cody Williams (first round), Isaiah Collier (first round), Kyle Filipowski (second round)

Offseason priority: The Lauri Markkanen extension.

The Jazz have three options when it comes to Markkanen. The first is to explore the trade market for the former All-Star. Markkanen is entering the last year of his contract and is unlikely to sign a four-year $113 million contract starting in July. The team-friendly $25.2 million first-year salary, is less than what the forward could sign for as a free agent in 2025. The maximum starting salary next season is $44.4 million.

Utah could renegotiate Markkanen's contract with cap space and then use the balance in free agency or trades. However, Markkanen is not renegotiation-eligible until Aug. 6. The Jazz are allowed to increase his $18 million salary up to $42.3 million and then extend for an additional $202 million over four seasons.

They are also permitted to decrease the renegotiated salary up to 40% and then extend off that number. Markkanen continues to play at an All-Star level (he has one career appearance) and for a second straight season flirted with a 50/40/90 stat line.

More offseason priorities

How aggressive will the front office be to improve the roster? The Jazz have seven first-round picks from the Cavaliers, Lakers and Timberwolves over the next seven years. Five of those firsts are unprotected.

Team needs

Offseason development from Taylor Hendricks and Keyonte George into full-time starters Consistency and rim protection with the starting lineup Size and defensive leadership in the starting backcourt A go-to ballhandling scorer who can complement Markkanen

Future draft assets rating: 10 out of 10

Utah will have unprotected firsts from Cleveland and Minnesota in 2025 and in 2027. The Jazz are also owed a 2029 unprotected first from Cleveland and a top-five-protected 2029 first from Minnesota. Utah also has the right to swap firsts with Minnesota or Cleveland (top-eight protected) in 2028. Utah is also owed a top-five-protected first from the Lakers in 2027. Utah will send its own 2025 first to Oklahoma City if it falls outside of the top 10. The Jazz have three second-round picks available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Jazz are one of five teams that could have cap space exceeding $30 million. Including Markkanen's partially guaranteed contract salary and both first-round picks, Utah has $34 million in room. The financial flexibility does not include the non-guaranteed salaries of Omer Yurtseven, Kenneth Lofton Jr. and Darius Bazley. The Jazz have $6.5 million and $3 million trade exceptions that are no longer available if they are below the salary cap.

Available exceptions: $8 million room, second round and veteran minimum.

CBA impact: There are no trade restrictions. Utah has until the first day of the regular season to spend $127 million of the salary cap.

Extension eligible: Markkanen and John Collins (as of July 6); Collin Sexton (as of Sept. 3)

Free agent status

Kira Lewis Jr. | Bird | UFA Talen Horton-Tucker | Bird | UFA Kris Dunn | Early Bird | UFA Luka Samanic | Early Bird | UFA Johnny Juzang | Early Bird | UFA Micah Potter | Early Bird | UFA Washington Wizards

Offseason transactions: Malcolm Brogdon (trade), Alex Sarr (first round), Bub Carrington (first round), Kyshawn George (first round), Richaun Holmes (free agent)

Offseason priority: Free agent Tyus Jones. How does the veteran fit now with the additions of Brogdon and Carrington?

A career backup in his first eight seasons, Jones started a career-high 66 games in Washington last year. The veteran had career highs in points (12.0), assists (7.3), field goal percentage (48.9%) and 3-point shooting (41.4%). Jones averaged 1 turnover or less for the ninth consecutive season.

Per Cleaning the Glass, Jones ranked in the 90th percentile in assists to usage rate and turnover percentage at his position in three straight seasons.

The Corey Kispert rookie extension.

Team needs

Starting point guard and center NBA-quality rim-protector depth A big step in the development of Bilal Coulibaly A capable back-to-the-basket scoring threat A point-of-attack defender who can control the defensive pace of the game

Future draft assets rating: 7 out of 10

The Wizards have built up their draft assets since June but still owe New York a top-10-protected first in 2025. Their pick is top-eight protected in 2026. The earliest they can trade their own first is in 2028. Washington has the right to swap firsts with Phoenix in 2026, 2028 and 2030. Golden State will send its first in 2030, but only if it falls outside of the top 20. They have the second most favorable 2029 first of Portland, Boston and Milwaukee. The Wizards have 14 seconds available.

Cash: $7.3 million (to send) | $7.3 million (to receive)

Cap space breakdown: The Wizards have $140 million in guaranteed salary and an additional $17.6 million of non-guaranteed contracts.

Available exceptions: $12.9 million non-tax midlevel exception, $4.7 million biannual, trade ($12.4 million, $9.8 million, $5.4 million and $3.5 million) and veteran minimum

CBA impact: The Wizards are hard capped at the $178.7 million first apron. They are $13 million below.

Extension eligible:  Marvin Bagley III and Kispert (as of July 6)

Free agent status

Anthony Gill | Bird | UFA Tyus Jones | Bird | UFA Tristan Vukcevic | Team | Non-Bird | UFA Jules Bernard | Non-Bird | UFA Bird rights explainer

Bird rights

A team can exceed the cap to sign a free agent who has played three consecutive seasons with his current team. Bird rights transfer to a new team in a trade.

Early Bird rights

Teams can exceed the cap to sign a player who has spent two consecutive seasons with a team (without being waived, carries over in a trade), but they are restricted to 175% of his previous salary or 105% of the average player salary. A team can exceed either limit with available cap space. A contract signed using the early Bird exception must be for a minimum of two years, not including options. It cannot exceed four years.

Non-Bird rights

A free agent who has played one season with a team can sign for 120% of his previous contract or 120% of the minimum salary exception. Teams can exceed either limit but only with cap space or an exception.

Restricted free agent

A free agent either coming off his first-round rookie contract or who has signed a three-year contract and has three or fewer years of service can be given a qualifying offer, making him a restricted free agent. In that case, his current team would have the right to match any offer. If the player is coming off a one-year or two-year deal, the maximum salary in the first year on an offer sheet from another team cannot exceed the full mid-level.

Note: A first-round pick who had his third-year or fourth-year option in his rookie-scale contract declined cannot be extended a qualifying offer and becomes an unrestricted free agent. His current team is limited to offering a contract with a first-year salary worth up to the value of the declined option.